Tuesday, July 13, 2010

If you are looking for movies...

I'm trying to keep my expectations realistic. But I can't help it, and I'm excited about Christopher Nolan's new film Inception - that is starting this Friday. He has a pretty clean and incredibly impressive record: Memento, Insomnia, Batman Begins, The Prestige, and Dark Knight (I haven't seen Following - his first film). So yes, I was burnt by disappointing Avatar before. But I really can't see a way Nolan can disappoint at the same level (plus Inception has a great cast!).

In any case, while we are waiting for Inception, you can check out other movies as well. I had earlier mentioned that I have been recording short film autopsies with Kevin Anderson of UMass - and I posted an autopsy of Splice last month. Well, we have reviewed 6 more films and you can find them at Film Autopsy, and 3 more will be up by next week. These are the films we have opened up so far (you can click on them to listen to the visual podcast):

Solitary Man
Winter's Bone (if you like well-crafted human drama, check this one out)
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (a good thriller, and the sequel is also now out)
The Square
Vincere
Terribly Happy
Splice

In addition to these, autopsies are coming up for Harry Brown, Exit Through the Gift Shop, and Micmacs (you can also of course link to our Film Autopsy Facebook page, and you can get updates directly).

For a sample, here is a Chainsaw Autopsy of Solitary Man (chainsaw autopsies are about 3 minutes in length - whereas, regular autopsies are about 7 minutes in long):



More autopsies here.

2 comments:

Dr. M. Akbar Hussain said...

Extrasolar Earth-like planets is my favourite subject in astronomy but was nearly killed by movies like Avatar. Anyways they found a nice escape route by suggesting that these were a hybrid of humans and some other specie. More or less same in Splice. But I still don't get the physics behind the floating rocks :-)

Salman Hameed said...

Oh those floating rocks, while cool looking, had no reasonable explanation (yeah - magnetic vortices created those...). Cameron's biology may have been good, but his geology needed some serious rethinking...