Tuesday, March 22, 2011

A new e-book: Revolution in the Arab World

By Salman Hameed


Things in the Middle East are still in turmoil. I'm sure everyone is getting a tutorial on the complexity of local politics. Bahrain, Yemen, Syria - all with very different types of uprisings, and none similar to Tunisia and Egypt. And then, of course, you have Gadhafi and his unique brand of brutal craziness. Nidhal and I have written multiple posts here on Tunisia and Egypt (for example, see On the use of social media in the uprisings in the Middle East, Statistical analysis to predict the next revolution(s), How important is the internet in Tunisia uprising?

During all this, I have been following articles and blogs on Foreign Policy Magazine. They present an interesting analysis (some from US perspective and some more general), and now they have a special report (an e-book), Revolution in the Arab World, that collects some of their articles related to the uprisings from the past year. What? Past year? Actually the first section of the book is quite interesting and it looks at the rumblings of the revolutions in the months preceding the Tunisia uprising.

I think this is a fantastic way to take advantage of e-publishing. This book is timely and provides a nice guide to the current politics in the region. Here is a short blurb:

Where did this wave of anger come from? Why did it begin in Tunisia, and what does it mean? FP's special report starts with a revelatory first chapter that shows how the revolutionary rumblings were ignored, dating back to Issandr El Amrani's prescient warning to Barack Obama in January 2010: Egypt, he wrote, could be the ticking time bomb that overwhelms your international agenda. The coverage also includes a dramatic day-by-day retelling of the battle to hold Tahrir Square, insider accounts of Washington's flip-flopping and struggle to keep up with events, and some of the world’s leading authors and experts, from James Traub to Gary Sick to Robert D. Kaplan, on where we go from here.
Consider it a guidebook for these revolutionary times. 
You can find the table of contents here. You can buy it here.

1 comment:

Don said...

Thanks for the tip! I'll check that out as soon as I'm done with these blasted term papers.